Hollywood, Feminism, And Some Thoughts On Female Emotion

Hollywood does it again ...
Hollywood does it again …

I recently had some fun watching Captain America: Winter Soldier. While I did not have hard and high expectations of greatness of the special effects extravaganza, overall I was not disappointed. However, I noticed something strange about the film’s fictional world.

Two of the major characters were capable of super-human feats due to their scientific augmentations. A third character also seemed capable of similar feats, though without the same augmentation (or any that was mentioned in the film). The two augmented characters were men and the third character was a woman.

What I took away from the film was that men are weak and need technology to function with any courage or strength in the world whereas women are naturally courageous and strong. It seems that Hollywood just cannot help itself. Captain America may be a super hero, but he is a man and men are inferior next to the greatness of women.

Sigh.

Frankly, I find male super-heroes to be limited in their ability to be interesting and female bad asses I find utterly boring.

On another note, based on what I have observed over the past few years, I theorize that men are natural isolationists whereas women thrive on emotional connection. Women are driven by their emotions, to varying degrees, and when their hunger for deep emotional connection consumes them they will fight viciously for that connection. If it takes intense anger and tears between two people, then they will act with chaotic disruption to cause that anger and those tears in order to have that deep, emotional common ground. It drives men to hunger for isolation intensely and they become detached and distant.

This is why women should not drive relationships.

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Author: M.W. Peak

Just a humble guy trying to make his way in the universe.

1 thought on “Hollywood, Feminism, And Some Thoughts On Female Emotion”

  1. “Two of the major characters were capable of super-human feats due to their scientific augmentations. A third character also seemed capable of similar feats, though without the same augmentation (or any that was mentioned in the film). The two augmented characters were men and the third character was a woman.”

    I haven’t seen the movie yet, so I can’t comment on whether there was some subtle (or outright missing) explanation for this… and no, don’t tell me anything! I plan to see it this week.

    But this is nothing new in comics and comics-related works. Fem-superiority has been around for ages, partly due to several prominent (and uber-feminist) writers in past decades openly pushing it.

    “I find male super-heroes to be limited in their ability to be interesting and female bad asses I find utterly boring”

    And the thing is, it doesn’t have to be that way. Comics I read as a kid had very interesting heroes, Batman for one, and female superheroes were treated as capable, sometimes even lethal, but not goddesses. I suspect one part of the problem is that comics these days are written more about pseudo-“emotional connection” stories than, you know, superheroics and problem solving.

    [MM: A friend of mine is a fan of Batman because, he says, underneath all the technology, Bruce Wayne is as mortal as any man. The technology augments the man beyond the bounds of his natural limitations, allowing him to be a hero. This is, I believe, the most interesting definition of a ‘super-hero’.]

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